Sirin Art Print
Sirin Art Print
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  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Sirin Art Print
Free Worldwide Shipping, shipped from Estonia
Printed on high-quality matte photo paper
Comes with an info sheet on the deity

Sirin Art Print

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€26,00
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€26,00
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Free Worldwide Shipping, shipped from Estonia
Printed on high-quality matte photo paper
Comes with an info sheet on the deity

The Sirin is a mythological creature from Slavic folklore, often depicted as a bird with the face of a beautiful woman. The legend of Sirin might have been introduced to Rus' by Persian merchants in the 8th-9th century. In the cities of Chersonesos and Kyiv she is often found on pottery, golden pendants, even on the borders of Gospel books of tenth-twelfth centuries.

This half-woman half-bird is directly based on the later folklore about sirens. Sirin sang beautiful songs to the saints, foretelling future blisses, however she was also dangerous. Men who heard her would forget everything on earth, follow her, and ultimately die. People would attempt to save themselves from Sirin by shooting cannons, ringing bells and making other loud noises to scare the bird off.

According to folk tales, at the morning of the Apple Feast of the Saviour day, Sirin flies into the apple orchard and cries sadly. In the afternoon, the Alkonost flies to this place, beginning to rejoice and laugh. Alkonost brushes dew from her wings, granting healing powers to all fruits on the tree she is sitting on. 

Both the Sirin and Alkonost have been influenced by Christian and pre-Christian mythology, leading to variations in their interpretations. The Alkonost, symbolizing joy, hope, and paradise, contrasts with the Sirin, which, despite its beautiful song, can embody the longing for what cannot be reached or the sadness of earthly life compared to the divine.

Their depiction together in art and folklore might still symbolize the balance and spectrum of human emotions and the dual nature of life itself—combining elements of joy, hope, and sorrow, reflecting the complex relationship humans have with the divine and the earthly.

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