Babylon the Great Art Print
Babylon the Great Art Print
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Printed on high-quality matte photo paper
Comes with an info sheet on the deity

Babylon the Great Art Print

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Free Worldwide Shipping, shipped from Estonia
Printed on high-quality matte photo paper
Comes with an info sheet on the deity

Babylon the Great, commonly known as the Wh0re of Babylon, refers to both a symbolic female figure and place of evil mentioned in the Book of Revelation in the Bible. Her full title is stated in Revelation as "Mystery, Babylon the Great, the Mother of Prostitutes and Abominations of the Earth". Revelation 17 states that the woman is actually a representation of "the great city which reigneth over the kings of the earth".

The Book of Revelation depicts Babylon as the paragon of idolatrous evil. Adorned ornately in expensive clothes and jewelry, and riding upon the imperial beast, she is the foil to the forthcoming New Jerusalem that will serve as Christ's metaphoric pure bride. The woman's description alludes to and amplifies harlot imagery.  Revelation's audience plays the role of male spectators being warned against the prostitute (political evils) paraded before them.

Most scholars agree that Babylon represents Rome but some maintain that John kept the city’s ultimate symbolism ambiguous so that his writing could remain timeless. If the metaphor symbolizes Rome, it is again puzzling that the author opted to refer to Babylon as a prostitute and not simply an adulterous man or woman.  Rome gained its political allegiances through colonization and political unions, which is better represented by a cheating spouse (man or woman) than a female prostitute. But one issue is inherently problematic: John unapologetically genders his metaphor. Making one of God's political entities a woman is yet another sign of active male acceptance of women as inferior and s3xually abnormal.

In any case, the most common medieval view is that Babylon and Jerusalem referred to two spiritual cities which were spiritually at war with one another, throughout all of history. They also represented two principles at war with one another, inside each individual person, even inside seemingly worldly Christian monarchs.

For further reading, I highly suggest reading "Babylon Revisited: A Feminist Inspired Reading of The Wh0re of Babylon" by Jonathan Redding.

I hope you like this piece!

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