Coatlicue Art Print
Coatlicue Art Print
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Free Worldwide Shipping, shipped from Estonia
Printed on high-quality matte photo paper
Comes with an info sheet on the deity

Coatlicue Art Print

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€26,00
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€26,00
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Free Worldwide Shipping, shipped from Estonia
Printed on high-quality matte photo paper
Comes with an info sheet on the deity

Coatlicue is represented as a woman wearing a skirt of writhing snakes and a necklace made of human hearts hands and skulls. Her feet and hands are adorned with claws and her breasts are depicted as hanging flaccid from pregnancy. Her face is formed by two facing serpents (after her head was cut off and the blood spurt forth from her neck in the form of two gigantic serpents)[5] referring to the myth that she was sacrificed during the beginning of the present creation.

According to Aztec legend Coatlicue was once magically impregnated by a ball of feathers that fell on her while she was sweeping a temple and subsequently gave birth to the god Huitzilopochtli. Her daughter Coyolxauhqui then rallied Coatlicue's four hundred other children together and goaded them into attacking and decapitating their mother. The instant she was killed the god Huitzilopochtli suddenly emerged from her womb fully grown and armed for battle. He killed many of his brothers and sisters including Coyolxauhqui whose head she cut off and threw into the sky to become the moon. In one variation on this legend Huitzilopochtli himself is the child conceived in the ball-of-feathers incident and is born just in time to save his mother from harm.

Cecelia Klein argues that the famous Coatlicue statue in the National Museum of Anthropology in Mexico and several other complete and fragmentary versions may actually represent a personified snake skirt. The reference is to one version of the creation of the present Sun. The myth relates that the present Sun began after the gods gathered at Teotihuacan and sacrificed themselves. The best-known version states that Tezzictecatl and Nanahuatzin immolated themselves becoming the moon and the sun. However other versions add a group of women to those who sacrificed themselves including Coatlicue. Afterward the Aztecs were said to have worshiped the skirts of these women which came back to life. Coatlicue thus has creative aspects which may balance the skulls hearts hands and claws that connect her to the earth deity Tlaltecuhtli. The earth both consumes and regenerates life.

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