Frigg Art Print
Frigg Art Print
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Frigg Art Print
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Frigg Art Print
Free Worldwide Shipping, shipped from Estonia
Printed on high-quality matte photo paper
Comes with an info sheet on the deity

Frigg Art Print

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€26,00
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€26,00
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Free Worldwide Shipping, shipped from Estonia
Printed on high-quality matte photo paper
Comes with an info sheet on the deity

Frigg. Goddess of foresight wisdom fertility household motherhood love marriage and domestic arts in Norse Mythology. She is the highest-ranking of the Aesir goddesses wife of Odin the leader of the gods and the mother of Baldur.
Frigg’s known primary roles were familial roles mostly surrounding her husband and children.
Her symbols include the spinning wheel and spindle which I've added onto this illustration as well. As she is the goddess of foresight she is thought to weave events into being. So happened with her own fate as well which has to do with the attached mistletoe. While she was greatly blessed she also faced terrible heartache which would eventually serve as her legacy.
The myth surrounding Frigg and her role as a mother is by far the most famous. She had a son Balder who was the light of her life. She was also incredibly protective. This instinct became stronger when Balder had a dream that predicted his own death.

Frigg went around to every living thing in the entire world and demanded that her son would not be harmed. She was unable to demand protection from the mistletoe which seemed insignificant at the time.
However one day Loki tricked Balders half brother who was blind to play a game which resulted in him shooting a dart made out of mistletoe at Balder killing him.

Frigg was in despair and asked Hel to release him from the underworld. Hel agreed to release Frigg’s son but only if all living things would weep for him.

Frigg went around asking every living thing in the world to weep for her lost son. They all agreed expect for one giantess named Thokk. This cursed Balder to the Underworld forever.

Although her story is tragic it also shows her strong will as a mother to literally go to the ends of the earth for her child. Hence I've illustrated her in a more motherly figure calmly weaving events to take place unknowing that she is also weaving her own tragic fate.

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