Lughnasadh Ornament
Lughnasadh Ornament
Lughnasadh Ornament
Lughnasadh Ornament
Lughnasadh Ornament
Lughnasadh Ornament
Lughnasadh Ornament

Lughnasadh Ornament

Regular price
€29,00
Sale price
€29,00
Regular price
€54,00
Unit price
per 

This goddess miniature is great for either home decor, your car, bag, keychain, garden etc. The possibilities are endless!


NOW 100% waterproof! 

Comes with removable hemp cord, so you can use it right away or remove as you wish! 


Size: 10cm

Material: Eco plant-based resin

Attributes: Comes with rope to use for hanging the ornament, 3D ornament, so it looks good on any side!


Made in Estonia by me and my brother. By purchasing this ornament, you are not only getting a beautiful decor item, but also supporting a family run business!


Want more than one? Please check for the bundle deal under the Ornaments section on my website!

 

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Lughnasadh or Lughnasa is a Gaelic festival marking the beginning of the harvest season. Historically it was widely observed throughout Ireland Scotland and the Isle of Man. In Modern Irish it is called Lúnasa in Scottish Gaelic: Lùnastal and in Manx: Luanistyn. Traditionally it is held on 1 August or about halfway between the summer solstice and autumn equinox. In recent centuries some of the celebrations have been shifted to the Sunday nearest this date.

Lughnasadh is one of the four Gaelic seasonal festivals along with Samhain Imbolc and Beltane. It corresponds to other European harvest festivals such as the Welsh G?yl Awst and the English Lammas.

Lughnasadh is mentioned in some of the earliest Irish literature and has pagan origins. The festival itself is named after the god Lugh. It inspired great gatherings that included religious ceremonies ritual athletic contests (most notably the Tailteann Games) feasting matchmaking and trading. Lughnasadh occurred during a very poor time of the year for the farming community when the old crops were done and the new ones not yet ready for harvest.

Traditionally there were also visits to holy wells. According to folklorist Máire MacNeill evidence shows that the religious rites included an offering of the First Fruits a feast of the new food and of bilberries the sacrifice of a bull and a ritual dance-play in which Lugh seizes the harvest for mankind and defeats the powers of blight. Many of the activities would have taken place on top of hills and mountains.

Lughnasadh customs persisted widely until the 20th century with the event being variously named 'Garland Sunday' 'Bilberry Sunday' 'Mountain Sunday' and 'Crom Dubh Sunday'. The custom of climbing hills and mountains at Lughnasadh has survived in some areas although it has been re-cast as a Christian pilgrimage. The best known is the 'Reek Sunday' pilgrimage to the top of Croagh Patrick on the last Sunday in July. A number of fairs are also believed to be survivals of Lughnasadh for example the Puck Fair.

Since the late 20th century Celtic neopagans have observed Lughnasadh or something based on it as a religious holiday. In some places elements of the festival have been revived as a cultural event.



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