Odin and Frigg Altar Statue Bundle
Odin and Frigg Altar Statue Bundle
Odin and Frigg Altar Statue Bundle
Odin and Frigg Altar Statue Bundle
Odin and Frigg Altar Statue Bundle
Odin and Frigg Altar Statue Bundle
Odin and Frigg Altar Statue Bundle
Odin and Frigg Altar Statue Bundle
Odin and Frigg Altar Statue Bundle
Free Worldwide Shipping, shipped from Estonia
Handmade in Estonia
Made from eco plant-based resin
Comes with an info sheet about the festivity
Height: 13 cm / 5 inch
Width: 6 cm / 2.3 inch
Weight: 160 g / 5.6 ounces

Odin and Frigg Altar Statue Bundle

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€170,00
Sale price
€170,00
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Free Worldwide Shipping, shipped from Estonia
Handmade in Estonia
Made from eco plant-based resin
Comes with an info sheet about the festivity
Height: 13 cm / 5 inch
Width: 6 cm / 2.3 inch
Weight: 160 g / 5.6 ounces
Odin, also called Wodan, Woden, or Wotan, one of the principal gods in Norse mythology. His exact nature and role, however, are difficult to determine because of the complex picture of him given by the wealth of archaeological and literary sources. Later literary sources, however, indicate that at the end of the pre-Christian period Odin was the principal god in Scandinavia.

Odin has many names and is the god of both war and death. Half of the warriors who die in battle are taken to his hall of Valhalla. He is the one-eyed All-Father, who sacrificed his eye for wisdom.

He has two sons, Balder by his first wife Frigg and Thor by Jord. Odin also has several animals. His two ravens Hugin and Munin (thought and memory) fly around the world and report back what they see. Sleipnir the eight-legged horse can run through all the worlds. Geri and Freki are Odin’s wolves.

He learned the magical art of prophecy from Freyja.

Here I have depicted him leaning on the world tree (Yggdrasil), sitting infront of a forgotten rune stone that has started to grow moss. This is to symbolise his own ancientness and how much of the information and wisdom we gather from mythology and history can go under overgrowth as time passes, if we do not give them the proper care and attention they deserve. So here's to all the stories that have gone missing, but live on in our collective and bestow us with wisdom forever!

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Frigg. Goddess of foresight, wisdom, fertility, household, motherhood, love, marriage, and domestic arts in Norse Mythology. She is the highest-ranking of the Aesir goddesses, wife of Odin, the leader of the gods, and the mother of Baldur.
Frigg’s known primary roles were familial roles, mostly surrounding her husband and children.
Her symbols include the spinning wheel and spindle, which I've added onto this illustration as well. As she is the goddess of foresight, she is thought to weave events into being. So happened with her own fate as well, which has to do with the attached mistletoe. While she was greatly blessed, she also faced terrible heartache, which would eventually serve as her legacy.
The myth surrounding Frigg and her role as a mother is by far the most famous. She had a son Balder, who was the light of her life. She was also incredibly protective. This instinct became stronger when Balder had a dream that predicted his own death.

Frigg went around to every living thing in the entire world and demanded that her son would not be harmed. She was unable to demand protection from the mistletoe, which seemed insignificant at the time.
However one day Loki tricked Balders half brother, who was blind, to play a game which resulted in him shooting a dart made out of mistletoe at Balder, killing him.

Frigg was in despair and asked Hel to release him from the underworld. Hel, agreed to release Frigg’s son, but only if all living things would weep for him.

Frigg went around asking every living thing in the world to weep for her lost son. They all agreed, expect for one giantess named Thokk. This cursed Balder to the Underworld forever.

Although her story is tragic, it also shows her strong will as a mother to literally go to the ends of the earth for her child. Hence I've illustrated her in a more motherly figure, calmly weaving events to take place, unknowing that she is also weaving her own tragic fate.

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** Runes on the back read 'think of me, I'll think of you' which is from a poem found on various weaving knives throughout Sweden and Norway. The full poem goes 'Think of me, I'll think of you. Love me, I'll love you'. The other half of the poem is behind the statue of his wife, Frigg.

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